Rakuing in Ceramics

Raku (楽焼 raku-yaki) is a Japanese term that refers to a 16th century technique and philosophy of ceramics and firing that became an integral part of the Japanese Tea Ceremony during that time. It encompasses the idea of cherishing the “imperfect”, or as it is referred to in Japan, Wabi-sabi (). Tea Bowls, or “chawan” were low fire glazed, quickly fired (as opposed to a typical firing), and “pulled” from the kiln while still hot. They would be allowed to cool rapidly in the air, which resulted in unpredictable, “Wabi-Sabi” glaze results… in the 1950’s, a then young Paul Soldner, American potter, began to introduce an “American method” of Raku, keeping the  Wabi-sabi philosophy but creating more vivid and colorful glazes than those which had been used traditionally in Japan. Pieces would be “smoked” or “oxygen reduced” or simply, “reduced” after being pulled, to create the wildly unpredictable and striking metallic colors that we see in much of the raku pieces today. -l. gascogne

Pics/ video by l. gascogne

Below: JCCC CERAMICS STUDENTS RAKUING

If the video does not play, Try THIS:

 

Jane did a GREAT job pulling a LOT of pieces for the raku firing!
Sam Davis’s students watch in amazement as pieces get pulled from the hot kiln during the Raku process Sam Davis’s Ceramics class participates in a raku firing process.

 

Samuel Davis’s Ceramics class – Rakuing

Raku (楽焼 raku-yaki) is a Japanese term that refers to a 16th century technique and philosophy of ceramics and firing that became an integral part of the Japanese Tea Ceremony during that time. It encompasses the idea of cherishing the “imperfect”, or as it is referred to in Japan, Wabi-sabi (). Tea Bowls, or “chawan” were low fire glazed, quickly fired (as opposed to a typical firing), and “pulled” from the kiln while still hot. They would be allowed to cool rapidly in the air, which resulted in unpredictable, “Wabi-Sabi” glaze results… in the 1950’s, a then young Paul Soldner, American potter, began to introduce an “American method” of Raku, keeping the  Wabi-sabi philosophy but creating more vivid and colorful glazes than those which had been used traditionally in Japan. Pieces would be “smoked” or “oxygen reduced” or simply, “reduced” after being pulled, to create the wildly unpredictable and striking metallic colors that we see in much of the raku pieces today. -l. gascogne

Pics/ video by l. gascogne

Below: JCCC CERAMICS STUDENTS RAKUING

 

Jane did a GREAT job pulling a LOT of pieces for the raku firing!
Sam Davis’s students watch in amazement as pieces get pulled from the hot kiln during the Raku process Sam Davis’s Ceramics class participates in a raku firing process.

 

Kids Class in Ceramics Studio 10/28

We had our first Kids class in partnership with the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art here on campus!

This is a short “pilot” class to see how things would go. So far, they have gone great!  The kids made Yunomi (a Japanese word) cups–a type of cup, taller than it is wide. Next week we will apply surfaces to the cups! The pieces were very diverse and interesting. The kids had a great time!

Johnson County Community College